Mother Teresa: She loved suffering and had a deeply flawed personality

Mother Teresa: She loved suffering and had a deeply flawed personality

It is crazy if you write Mother Teresa in a search engine, you will be flooded with articles admiring her personality. How she spent her life helping the poor. Also in many polls and surveys people also ranked her as the most widely admired people of the twentieth century.

But the truth is something entirely different. She died in 1997 and yet not many people know about her shady character. She was no saint. Instead, she loved suffering and poverty.

In Christopher Hitchens’s cleverly titled book, The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice, which I found deeply disturbing, he mentions surprising facts about her erroneous personality. Excerpts from which you can read here and here, but I urge you to read the book.

Research says she was evil

In its “criticism” section of her biography, Wikipedia summarizes the growing opprobrium related to her extreme love of suffering (that is, the suffering of her “patients”), her refusal to provide adequate medical care, her association with (and financial support from) shady characters, and her treatment of her nuns.

Mother Teresa whose real name was Agnes Gonxha, was anything but a saint as revealed in the official press release by the Université de Montréal.

The myth of altruism and generosity surrounding Mother Teresa is dispelled in a paper by Serge Larivée and Genevieve Chenard of University of Montreal’s Department of Psychoeducation and Carole Sénéchal of the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Education.

Like the journalist and author Christopher Hitchens, who also concluded that her hallowed image does not stand up to analysis of the facts and was constructed and that her beatification was orchestrated by an effective media relations campaign?

Serge Larivée and his colleagues also cite a number of problems not take into account by the Vatican in Mother Teresa’s beatification process, such as “her rather dubious way of caring for the sick, her questionable political contacts, her suspicious management of the enormous sums of money she received, and her overly dogmatic views regarding, in particular, abortion, contraception, and divorce.”

The release levels three types of accusations against mother Teresa and her supporters

1. The woman was in love with suffering and simply didn’t take care of her charges, many of whom fruitlessly sought medical care.

“At the time of her death, Mother Teresa had opened 517 missions welcoming the poor and sick in more than 100 countries. The missions have been described as “homes for the dying” by doctors visiting several of these establishments in Calcutta.

“Two-thirds of the people coming to these missions hoped to find a doctor to treat them, while the other third lay dying without receiving appropriate care. The doctors observed a significant lack of hygiene, even unfit conditions, as well as a shortage of actual care, inadequate food, and no painkillers.

“The problem is not a lack of money—the Foundation created by Mother Teresa has raised hundreds of millions of dollars—but rather a particular conception of suffering and death:

“There is something beautiful in seeing the poor accept their lot, to suffer it like Christ’s Passion. The world gains much from their suffering,” was her reply to criticism, cites the journalist Christopher Hitchens. Nevertheless, when Mother Teresa required palliative care, she received it in a modern American hospital.”

2. She was tightfisted about helping others, sequestered money donated for her work, and took money from dictators.

“Mother Teresa was generous with her prayers but rather miserly with her foundation’s millions when it came to humanity’s suffering.

“During numerous floods in India or following the explosion of a pesticide plant in Bhopal, she offered numerous prayers and medallions of the Virgin Mary but no direct or monetary aid.

“On the other hand, she had no qualms about accepting the Legion of Honor and a grant from the Duvalier dictatorship in Haiti. Millions of dollars were transferred to the MCO’s various bank accounts, but most of the accounts were kept a secret, Larivée says.

“‘Given the parsimonious management of Mother Teresa’s works, one may ask where the millions of dollars for the poorest of the poor have gone?’”

3. She was deliberately promoted by BBC journalist Malcolm Muggeridge (a fellow anti-abortionist), and her beatification was based on phony miracles.

“…In 1969, [Muggeridge] made a eulogistic film of the missionary, promoting her by attributing to her the “first photographic miracle,” when it should have been attributed to the new film stock being marketed by Kodak.

Afterward, Mother Teresa traveled throughout the world and received numerous awards, including the Nobel Peace Prize.

In her acceptance speech, on the subject of Bosnian women who were raped by Serbs and now sought an abortion, she said: ‘I feel the greatest destroyer of peace today is abortion because it is a direct war, a direct killing—direct murder by the mother herself.’

…Following her death, the Vatican decided to waive the usual five-year waiting period to open the beatification process. [JAC: As I recall, it took only a year.] The miracle attributed to Mother Theresa was the healing of a woman, Monica Besra, who had been suffering from intense abdominal pain.

“The woman testified that she was cured after a medallion blessed by Mother Theresa was placed on her abdomen. Her doctors thought otherwise: the ovarian cyst and tuberculosis from which she suffered were healed by the drugs they had given her. The Vatican, nevertheless, concluded that it was a miracle.

“Mother Teresa’s popularity was such that she had become untouchable for the population, which had already declared her a saint.

“What could be better than beatification followed by canonization of this model to revitalize the Church and inspire the faithful especially at a time when churches are empty and the Roman authority is in decline?” Larivée and his colleagues ask.”

All of this echo, substantiate and expand the criticisms leveled by Hitchens.

But at the end of the press release, the university (and, I presume, the investigators) offer what I see as a complete sop to those who might be disheartened by the above.

Conclusion

History is full of false idols. And our governments still continue to adore and hide their sins. Mother Teresa myth may have inspired people who genuinely think of helping destitute and crushing poverty. But still what’s the evidence behind it.

She was a two-faced woman who thought suffering is the way to Jesus Christ. We should open our eyes and research our history because everything we have been told is a lie.

Reference: Whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com / Christopher Hitchens’s book, The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice, is available to purchase on Amazon.com

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